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RE-USE

LAMPS MADE OUT OF BOTTLES

PET bottles can also be used to produce lamps. And how? The Spanish designer Alvaro Catalán de Ocón shows us how. He designed stylish lamps around the used bottles as part of a project in Bogota in Columbia.

Recycling

BOTTLE CAPS IN THE BUMPER

The small runabout car Opel Adam is not only produced in Germany, it also offers a number of sustainable features. Old bottle caps from PET bottles have been made into car bumpers. Because the caps form the basis of a plastic granulate which is used to make, among other things, bumper mountings and headlamp housing.

Picture source: © GM Company

Recycling

PLASTIC CAPS TO SIT ON

The Capped Out Chair from BRC Design consists of hundreds of colourful bottle caps. Benjamin Rollins Caldwell developed this creative armchair with great attention to detail. The former bottle caps are attached together with zip ties over a steel construction giving the chair its special structure and colourful appearance.

Recycling

PET-ART AS AN INSPIRATION

The Czech artist Veronika Richterová shows just what you can do with PET bottles if you have creative and innovative ideas. She makes fascinating sculptures out of used PET bottles – animals, plants, chandeliers, sofas and even a bra are included in her collection. She enjoys working with PET bottles because of their transparency and lightness and also of course because they are available everywhere. Richterová's PET art has already been on display for visitors to admire in exhibitions throughout Europe.

Recycling

PET TO SIT ON – THE "111 NAVY CHAIR"

It was originally developed for use on US Navy ships, nowadays it is a classic design piece for dining rooms: the "Navy Chair" by Emeco. After 66 years, the company has decided to present the chair for indoors and outdoors in a new material and instead of using aluminium, to use recycled PET bottles. 111 bottles are delivered by Coca-Cola to make one chair. The new version from 60 percent recycled material is, thanks to PET, not only stylish but also environmentally friendly.

Recycling

A LITRE OF LIGHT

Used PET bottles can deliver even more – for example a light source for simple housings. How does it work? The idea comes from students from the University of St. Gallen. The plastic bottle is filled with water and a small amount of bleach and then installed in the roof of the hut so that half the bottle juts out above the top. The water in the bottle now diffuses the daylight in the entire room below the bottle. The illuminating power of the bottle is equivalent to a 55 watt light bulb.

More on the initiative Light of Light

Recycling

BOTTLE EMPTY, BUILD A WALL

Honduras, 2005. A poor village in the north of the province Yoro. A funny German guy walks around with brochures. He shows pictures of neat, colourful houses to poor people, the unemployed, day labourers who live in temporary, run-down huts. "You could also have one of these", he announces to the amazed village dwellers. It isn't much easier to believe him when he explains what the houses are made of and the conditions required to build them: you need lots of people. They need to have a lot of time to spare. And you need empty plastic bottles to build them.

Recycling

PET BOTTLES CAN SAVE LIVES

It sounds incredible and yet so simple. With the help of the sun's rays and PET bottles, water is sterilized and made drinkable. The water is filled in transparent PET or glass bottles which are laid in the sun for 6 hours. In this time, the UV rays of the sun kill the germs that cause diarrhoea. The so-called SODIS method helps to prevent diarrhoea and so saves human lives. This is urgently required because over 4,000 children die every day from diarrhoeal diseases.

More at www.sodis.ch

Recycling

MODERN PET ARCHITECTURE

The Taiwanese architect Arthur Huang developed a method in which plastic waste is moulded into hollow forms and can therefore be used again as building material. The walls of the "EcoArk" building in Taipeh consist of 1.5 million of these shapes.

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Press contact

Mara Hancker

Forum PET in the German Plastics
Packaging Industry Association (IK).
Telefon: +49 (0) 6172-92 66 66
m.hancker@kunststoffverpackungen.de

PRESS RELEASES

05/2018

28.05.2018 “Ban on straws does not solve the marine litter problem” IK demands eliminating the causes instead of political gestures

The IK Industrievereinigung Kunststoffverpackungen e. V. (German Association for Plastics Packaging and Films) rejects the proposed ban on selected plastic products announced today by the EU Commission. “With its far-reaching Plastics Strategy, announced at the start of the year, the EU Commission obliged all stakeholders in the value creation chain to share responsibility for sustainable recovery and reuse, thereby raising the bar considerably,” IK Managing Director Dr Jürgen Bruder explains.

Bad Homburg, 28 May 2018 – The IK Industrievereinigung Kunststoffverpackungen e. V. (German Association for Plastics Packaging and Films) rejects the proposed ban on selected plastic products announced today by the EU Commission. “With its far-reaching Plastics Strategy, announced at the start of the year, the EU Commission obliged all stakeholders in the value creation chain to share responsibility for sustainable recovery and reuse, thereby raising the bar considerably,” IK Managing Director Dr Jürgen Bruder explains. “Bans on individual products completely overturn this holistic approach, which our industry wholeheartedly supports. Instead of truly sustainable collection and recovery solutions, resource efficiency and raising customer awareness of sustainable consumption and environmentally responsible handling of unavoidable waste, we are now seeing unnecessary political gesturing.”

Product bans do not bring about fundamental understanding

When it is a question of raising people’s awareness for the careful use of various resources and changing their behaviour in the long term, bans are hardly the right option. They do not bring about a genuine understanding of sustainable consumption and environmentally conscious behaviour. “It’s really a question of how we want to live and consume,” Dr Bruder adds. “If it has become a widespread trend to eat and drink when we’re out and about, we should be reinforcing the sustainable solutions already on offer for this – without discriminating against certain materials right from the start.” After all, such bans can also lead people to fall back on materials which are ultimately even more harmful in ecological terms.” Life cycle assessment targets or also specific functional or use-related aspects, for example relating to the assessment of disposable crockery, are being ignored altogether. Take the following example: disposable crockery at major events. This is where plastic plates and cutlery provide real added value with regard to functionality, safety and hygiene. And afterwards they are collected and recovered. Why should such applications be prohibited? The IK expects awareness-raising and also the labelling of products regarding to their environmentally friendly disposal to have a more lasting effect – as proposed in draft legislation for an array of products – from beverage cups and fast food packaging to sanitary products. “In our opinion, prohibiting individual products is wholly disproportionate.” According to Dr Bruder, legislative bodies should rather pay more attention to the general conditions for recovery and reuse. Ultimately, littering should be sanctioned more punitively in general.

A more sensible alternative: EU support for emerging countries and EU-wide landfill ban for plastic waste

Roughly 80% of global plastic waste in the oceans is generated by Asian countries, approximately 0.02% comes from Germany and about 1% from Europe. “Obviously, every tonne of waste is a tonne too much”, states Dr. Bruder. “The EU should, above all, help to develop sustainable waste management structures in those emerging nations that contribute to the global problem the most.”

The IK takes the view that, also within the EU, the EU Commission should concentrate on the consistent implementation of existing waste legislation in all EU member states and on an EU-wide landfill ban for plastic waste. Plastics are much too valuable to simply be dumped. Experience has shown that EU member states which have declared such a landfill ban perform best when it comes to plastic recycling. “With respect to the environment, we consider a landfill ban to be potentially more effective. The IK believes that it would make more sense to invest political energy in closing the loop and informing citizens instead of introducing bans,” says Dr Bruder, summing up the IK position.

Single use – a misleading term in the draft of the EU directive

We consider the phrase “single-use plastics”, also and especially when translated into German, to be misleading with regard to a host of applications. In this respect, people are often led to believe that disposable products in general are throwaway items and therefore to be avoided. “Single-use”, however, is often a reasonable response to particular product characteristics or hygiene requirements which can in many cases only be satisfied by the use of plastics. Take blood bags, disposable contact lenses or packaging for fresh meat, for example.

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